Pic and a Word #290: Bound out

Today a doomy poem and glimpses from the waterfront of Trieste, a city bound in nostalgia and history.

But first, three times that I was by the sea in Trieste:

Bound out

Bound to find out
it’s easier to go out with a whisper
than a flame,

bound to think
it only happens to other people,
you will be happened to.

Round on the way. Re-
bound on the way. Out-
run on the way. In
ground all the way.

The photos below – of the port and the waterfront, the Canal Grande (really very piccolo), and the Piazza Unità d’Italia – are from two visits.

The first part until the fisherman is from 2015 when amore and I continued from the port to the Miramare Castle. It was 6 am, amore just rode into town on the night train, hence the lovely light.

The second half is from another summer three years later when father took me to Trieste from Piran with the regular boat line. It felt good to invade Italy from sea. (Why do I write Trieste, like Italians do it? I should say Trst, in Slovenian. Yeah, there you go, remove all the vowels. Trst is – also, as much – ours.)

If you are curious about the history of Trieste, and there is plenty of it, I recommend the book by Jan Morris, called Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere. Never has the title been more spot on.

In response to Patrick Jennings’ Pic and a Word Challenge #290: Outbound

This day in my blogging history

Published by Manja Maksimovič

A Slovenian in Italy for love. Blogger, photographer, translator and would-be writer who would be a writer if she wrote. Plus reluctant but emerging poet. Beware.

26 thoughts on “Pic and a Word #290: Bound out

    1. Yes, it’s almost surrounded by Slovenia. In fact, many Slovenians were stuck on the wrong side of the border when it was set after WW2. Trieste could go either way, Slovenia or Italy, but then Marshall Tito of Yugoslavia made some pacts… Who knew what really happened.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Those photos certainly provide perspective, I especially like the one of the man cleaning. It works really well and the poem teams with the theme perfectly. It sounds like a voyage, though perhaps more of the Titanic than a gentle cruise 😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You mean the caves still in Italy, I. J.? Or did you cross into Slovenia to visit the Postojna cave, or even the Škocjan caves? I haven’t seen the ones in Italy. Funny to think that you were in Trieste. You must have entered Slovenia too at some point then… Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The ones still in Italy. I would have loved to travel down to Ljubljana, or even across the bay to Piran, but in the days of the iron curtain (and perhaps even now) visas had to be obtained before crossing the border.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Sarah. They are overwhelming but standing on firm ground and taking photos I can do. I wouldn’t wish to travel with one. From Trieste I took the ferry to Greece twice with my own car. We slept outside on the deck. Crazy youth!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Gawjuss photos, Manja. You never miss an opportunity, honestly. The sofa! Adore. The one of your dad (it is your dad, isn’t it?) next to the seamstress memorial statue – adore. It’s the juxtaposition of the two figures and the clock in the middle, it’s so harmonious. The black and white trio one!! The best. Stunning in so many ways. The cascade of profiles, the expressions, the light, the authenticity. So good.

    And interesting about Trieste, that you call it Trst in Slovenian, it’s like tryst almost or trust. I only know it as Trieste. How intriguing what you said about “Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere.” It does have a bit of a lost feeling by the end of the summer, I guess. I’ve been there a couple of times just as a stopover whilst going on somewhere else and I went for a walk one night and though I felt completely safe, I also felt such a feeling of disconnectedness and aloneness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love your hopping around so much, Sunra Nina. Around my blog and around Trieste where you caught it, the end of time and everything. I love your enthusiasm so much and your unique words (gawjuss!). The black and white trio, they are still alive but not together anymore. The boys’ parents split up. It makes it even deeper. I’m glad that you love my dad with the statue, I do too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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