PPAC: War memorials

I have gathered public monuments to the fallen from Slovenia and Italy of diverse artistry, but always here to make us think. After all, we used to kill each other. Plus there is this poem that I have been writing since Thursday when it all began.

Soft War Song

It’s the end of 
War Day One
and I’m grateful 
for the warmth, 
for the food,
for the water,
for no war,
at least not here
in the spring of Tuscany,
but then I see
that Ukraine is 
only removed from Slovenia
by one Hungary.

Softly softly

Meanwhile, 
they are in Chernobyl already.
They have taken over.
Why go after 
a closed down
clearly defunct
better-believe-untouchable
power plant
first thing 
on War Day One?
WHO IS SOFT ON THE BRAIN?	

Softly softly

Meanwhile, 
our Prime Minister
in a blue-yellow tie
regrets the current events.
He was just about to fly
to Ukraine himself
today, as a matter of fact.
Coincidence? 
Think not.
Sean Penn is there already.

Softly softly

As Finns panic-buy all the iodine tablets
that help with radiation 
(they do? never heard of them),
friends are posting songs like
“Let's Start a War 
(Said Maggie One Day)”
and “I Don’t Want to be a Soldier”,
and scientists warn
that the first octopus farm
would be an ethical disaster.

While the target is on you – 
for me the war is a sweet tweet,
a cute FB post,
a street art intervention.
 
Should we start believing 
that war happens to others 
while we still have this soft blanket
of basketball,
Eurovision Song Contest,
skiing,
Thursday Doors,
and free 
soft
fluffy
radioactive
octopi,
we are in for a hard fall.

Since this is a public art post as hosted by Marsha, I have gathered several monuments to the fallen in various wars from Slovenia where I’m from and Italy where I live now. If this were World War II., we would be on opposite sides.

I was 21 when Slovenia won its independence from Yugoslavia after a 10-day war. There was an air-attack warning already and the Yugoslav Army planes left Belgrade to bomb Ljubljana but somebody made them turn around. Some say that it was the Vatican.

For Photographing Public Art Challenge (PPAC) hosted by Marsha at Always Write

This day in my blogging history

Published by Manja Maksimovič

A Slovenian in Italy for love. Blogger, photographer, translator and would-be writer who would be a writer if she wrote. Plus reluctant but emerging poet. Beware.

32 thoughts on “PPAC: War memorials

  1. I love your poem. It’s just what I wanted to read today. I can’t really relax with it all going on, just hope we’re not on the brink of WW3. I suspect there will also be love-making amidst the war-making but we won’t hear about that, we’ll only see the desecration.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Manja, your beautiful and thoughtful post has both centered me and called me to greater attention and prayer. How many memorials you’ve seen and how much courage, loss and heartbreak they represent. The variety is moving too. Your photos and your rich poem are helping to bring the world closer — in common remembering and resolve.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your poem is incredibly well put together. A real poetess you are indeed. And an incredible photographer too. I took pleasure in the February page of “the calendar” this month. On Tuesday, I’ll reveal March. Thanks so very much for this lovely present that makes me feel close to you.
    Be safe, Amiga. I bless you. xoxo

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you most kindly, Selma. Yesterday I witnessed a miracle and thought of you. It was “just” basketball. 😀 Wrote the poem about it today. The space was made for the miracle and it came. Much love to you and happy March. It makes me smile to imagine you look at the calendar and smile. 🙂

      Like

  4. Manja, I read your poem with tears in my eyes. “Should we start believing
    that war happens to others
    while we still have this soft blanket
    of basketball,
    Eurovision Song Contest,
    skiing,
    Thursday Doors, …”

    We can only be grateful at this moment that is where we are. But as one of your readers said, this poem and the events today should drive us to prayers. All of us are only a step away from iodine tablets. (I never heard of that either.). Brilliant post, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

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